The Winter Show | A Benefit for East Side House Settlement

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East Side House Settlement

East Side House is a community-based organization in the South Bronx, and the owner and beneficiary of The Winter Show. We work with schools, community centers and other partners to bring quality education and resources to residents of the Bronx and Northern Manhattan, helping improve the lives of approximately 10,000 individuals each year.

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Park Avenue Armory
Historical Correction: “Forefathers," a photographic series by Maxine Helfman (b. 1952) chronicling the 18 slave-owning Presidents of the United States, will he presented at #thewintershow by @elleshushan.
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Seen here are the first and last Presidents to own slaves, George Washington and Ulysses S. Grant.
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Fair Highlight: Maxine Helfman, “Forefathers,” 2014, courtesy of Elle Shushan
Upper East Side
Look closely: Inspiration could strike anywhere. 💡
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Pictured: Cy Twombly's apartment in Rome, photographed by Horst P. Horst for @vogue in 1966
New York, New York
This exceptional credenza epitomizes Paul Evans's iconic twentieth-century design work. 📐
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Faceted in walnut burl and brass with a lustrous lacquered top, the credenza seamlessly blends clean geometric lines with texture and shine. ✨
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Does modern design get any more luxe? 😍
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Pictured: Credenza by Paul Evans for Directional Furniture, model number PE-366, American, dated 6/17/65 on a shelf-back
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Fair highlight courtesy of @lobelmodern, dealers in mid-century design focusing on exceptional craftsmanship and materials with an emphasis on furniture

2018

Fair Catalogue

Over 200 pages of fine art and antiques, architecture, interior design, luxury goods, and real estate, as well as essays on the 2018 loan exhibition and East Side House Settlement, the Fair’s beneficiary.

The Show is a … galaxy of colliding worlds. Nearly every booth provides a glimpse into some areas of visual culture, from Egyptian antiquities to American folk art to postwar Italian art glass.

The New York Times